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Here Are The Most Common Grammatical Errors You Should Spot Before Hitting "Send"

Have the good habit of proofreading again and again!

Even the best among us make these errors or slip-ups, and that's completely fine as long as we correct them before anyone else catches them. Here's a rundown of the most common grammatical errors in English people make, along with the rule.

I.e. and E.g.

Rule

"i.e." means "that is." It comes from the Latin "id est."

"e.g." means "for example." It comes from the Latin "exempli gratia."

Wrong

He likes so many genres of music, i.e. rock, electronic, and pop.

She's the head of the team, e.g., she calls the shots.

Right

He likes so many genres of music, e.g. rock, electronic, and pop.

She's the head of the team, i.e., she calls the shots.

You're/Your

Rule

"Your" indicates ownership, as in something belonging to "you."

"You're" is short for "you are."

Wrong

"Your welcome."

"Can I have you're number?"

Right

"You're welcome."

"Can I have your number?"

It's/Its

Rule

"It's" is short for "it is."

"Its" indicates ownership.

Wrong

"Its a very detailed proposal."

"The band is coming up with it's new song."

Right

"It's a very detailed proposal."

"The band is coming up with its new song."

There/Their/They're

Rule

"There" refers to a place or area that is far from the speaker; we also use it to state something.

"Their" indicates ownership.

"They're" is short for "they are"

Wrong

"Their going to visit tomorrow."

"They're contact hasn't called me up yet."

"May I borrow there equipment?"

"Their is going to be a storm."

Right

"They're going to visit tomorrow."

"Their contact hasn't called me up yet."

"May I borrow their equipment?"

"There is going to be a storm."

Lay/Lie (present tense)

* We are excluding the other definition of "lie," which is "not telling the truth." 

Rule

"Lay" needs a direct object (meaning the subject of the sentence is putting something (the object) down. "Lie," on the other hand, does not need an object (It is the subject doing the lying.).

Wrong

"I lay down on the sofa to sleep."

"Lie the books down on the table."

Right

"I (subject) lie down on the sofa to sleep." (There is no object)

"Lay the book (object) down on the table."

Lay/Lie (past tense)

Note

The past tense of "lay" is "laid," while the past tense of "lie" is "lay."

Wrong

"I lay the report on your desk last week."

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"Last weekend she just laid in bed all day."

Right

"I laid the report on your desk last week."

"Last weekend she just lay in bed all day."

Fewer/Less

Rule

"Fewer" refers to items you can count individually.

"Less" refers to a commodity you can't count individually.

Wrong

"There are less people now."

"There seems to be fewer grass on this side of the yard."

Right

"There are fewer people now."

"There seems to be less grass on this side of the yard."

To/Two/Too

Rule

"To" is used in the infinitive form of a verb: to + the base form of a verb. "To" is also used to mean "towards."

"Too" means "also" or "as well."

"Two" refers to the number 2.

Wrong

"The message is a bit to long for me to read right now."

"I go too work on holidays."

"He brought us to copies of the book."

"I'm going out of town, to."

Right

"The message is a bit too long for me to read right now."

"I go to work on holidays."

"He brought us two copies of the book."

"I'm going out of town, too."

Amount/Number

Rule

"Amount" refers to a commodity you can't count individually.

"Number" refers to individual things you can count.

Wrong

"A great amount of women are working out now."

"I was only given a small number of water."

Right

"A great number of women are working out now."

"I was only given a small amount of water."

Loose/Lose

Rule

"Loose" describes things that aren't tightly fitted or means "to release" something. "Lose" is a verb that means "to suffer a loss," "to part with," to fail to keep the possession of."

Wrong

"If you loose this opportunity, you'll be stuck in your predicament indefinitely."

"The knot she made was very lose."

Right

"If you lose this opportunity, you'll be stuck in your predicament indefinitely."

"The knot she made was very loose."

Alot/A Lot

Rule

"Alot" is not a word. If you want to say there is an abundance of something, use "a lot."

Wrong

"I have alot of unread e-mails!"

Right

"I have a lot of unread e-mails!"

I/Me

Rule

"I" is a subject pronoun, used for the one doing the verb.

"Me" is an object pronoun, used for the one receiving the action.

Wrong

"Me and Austin are off to the gym."

"Pablo took Austin and I to the gym."

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Right

"Austin and I are off to the gym."

"Pablo took Austin and me to the gym."

Who/Whom

Rule

"Who" refers to the subject of the sentence, while "whom" refers to the object. Use the "he/him" trick to help you:

Use "who" when the answer to the question is he or she. 

Use "whom" when the answer to the question is him or her. 

Wrong

"Who should I invite?"

"Whom is responsible for this?"

Right

"Whom should I invite?" (Answer: Invite HIM)

"Who is responsible for this?" (Answer: HE is.)

Irregardless

This is not a word. "Regardless" is.

With Regard To/With Regards To

Rule

When it comes to introducing or bringing up a topic, "with regard to" is correct.

"Regards" refers to friendly greetings. It can only be used to introduce a topic through the phrase "as regards."

Wrong

"Do you mind giving me feedback with regards to my performance?"

Right

"Do you mind giving me feedback with regard to my performance?"

"Do you mind giving me feedback in regard to my performance?"

"Do you mind giving me feedback as regards my performance?"

Better (because many believe "with regard to" is unnecessary business jargon)

"Do you mind giving me feedback regarding my performance?"

"Do you mind giving me feedback concerning my performance?"

When you need to double check your use of words and phrases, visit Learnersdictionary.com.

Sources: Learner's Dictionary, Quick and Dirty Tips, Grammarist, Inc, Entrepreneur, Your Dictionary, Oxford Royale Academy

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