An Honest Review Of 'Cara X Jagger'

This movie about memory is ironically forgettable.
PHOTO: Cara x Jagger/APT Entertainment/Cignal Entertainment

The Long Plot, Sans Spoilers

Cara (Jasmine Curtis-Smith) has a condition called "hyperthymesia" that gives her near-perfect autobiographical memory. She can remember what happened at any given time in her life as though it happened yesterday. Her ex-boyfriend Jagger (Ruru Madrid), however, lost his memory in a motorcycle accident. Jagger's grandfather enlists Cara to help Jagger recall his memories, which stirs up the past. Both Cara and Jagger realize the real reason for their breakup and have to decide if their past will keep them from having a future together.

The Short, Honest Plot

Another run-of-the-mill romance flick with a sort-of interesting premise that disintegrates into the same thing we've all seen a thousand times.

The Main Actors And Where You Last Saw Them

Jasmine Curtis-Smith as Cara

 

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Jasmine is having a busy year, with Cara X Jagger being her third film in 2019 alone. She was in Alone/Together with Liza Soberano and Enrique Gil, and starred in the horror flick Maledicto earlier this year. She was also on TV shows Daig Kayo Ng Lola Ko and Sahaya.

Ruru Madrid as Jagger

 

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Ruru has been in TV shows like Daig Kayo Ng Lola Ko, Daddy's Gurl, TODA One I Love, and the 2016 Encantadia reboot. He has also appeared in films like 2013's Bamboo Flowers, and 2014's Above The Clouds.

Did You Know?

1. Jasmine's sister, Anne Curtis, makes an interesting cameo in the film!

2. The movie's theme song is "Leaves" by Ben & Ben.

3. According to Ruru, it took them four takes to film their kissing scene.

4. Ruru also said that he was excited to meet and work with Jasmine as he was a fan of her, and even called her "one of the best actresses of her generation."

5. Hyperthymesia, the condition featured in the film, is so rare that only 61 people in the world have been diagnosed to have it.

What I Think:

When Cara (Jasmine Curtis-Smith) said in the beginning that she had a condition called "hyperthymesia," I thought I was in for something a lot more interesting than what eventually would happen. Imagine being able to remember everything like they happened yesterday and yet Cara's condition manifests itself most acutely when it's Jagger-related (Ruru Madrid), despite having experienced truly painful things in her life like her parents dying when she was young.

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Cara is so plagued by memories, she looked into facilities abroad that will help her forget. The film only uses these unique elements to set up the same old boy-meets-girl, boy-and-girl-break-up love story. The day she was supposed to fly out to some European country to get treatment, her ex-boyfriend's grandfather kidnaps her and requests her to help Jagger get his memory back because he got amnesia after a motorcycle accident on the same day he was going to propose. You know, like Meteor Garden.

But unlike Meteor Garden where the effects of memory loss created this complex and gut-wrenching tragedy for the leads to overcome, in this Ice Idanan-directed film, it's just the set-up for the two to relive their entire relationship history. We're not sure how or if Jagger's memory returns. The film is mostly scenes of them having supposedly-kilig moments that mirror their first go-around as a couple.

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I guess the film was going for a more "realistic" approach because the central theme of the film is that it takes two people to break up. We are shown that while Jagger did something wrong (unsurprisingly, he cheated on Cara out of nowhere), Cara's paranoia and mistrust exacerbated by her perfect memory is treated in the film as though it was equally bad. It wasn't handled with much depth, which made the film feel clunky, thinly-written, and even awkward to watch. This is also what usually happens when most of the dialogue was written for hugot purposes.

It's unfortunate how the writing turned a potentially fascinating premise like someone with perfect autobiographical memory into something so typical and forgettable. Also, it's 2019. I think it's time we retire the old amnesia trope.

I'd Recommend It To:

Those looking for a hugot film, or maybe those going through something in the love-life department.

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