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Enjoy Katsu Like Never Before In This Must-Try New Jap Resto

Craving pork tonkatsu, katsudon, or curry? We discovered a resto that serves them the way the Japanese really do it. Try it with your man or posse.

Since January is the time to try new things, including new places to enjoy lunch or dinner, we suggest you check out this new Japanese katsu place in SM Megamall Atrium with your man, your barkada, or your family. You won't regret it. Yabu: House of Katsu would satisfy your craving for deep-fried Japanese food--it's both something new and pleasantly familiar, sinfully savory yet still good for you.

Know Thy Food

The word katsu comes from the abbreviation of the word "katsuretsu," meaning "cutlets." This generally refers to a sliced piece of meat that is breaded and deep fried. This dish was first introduced to Japanese culture in the late 19th century, later leading to the popularity of tonkatsu ("ton" meaning pork in Japanese).

Yabu specializes in this dish, so do not expect to find any sushi or sashimi there. They have a different way of serving their katsu--complete with a sauce ritual (grind the sesame seeds, pour tonkatsu sauce, mix, and dip your katsu). Upon slicing the meat, you will see that it is incredibly tender. This is because they only use local pork that comes fresh and is never frozen. Those watching their weight after the holiday feasting can still indulge in the deep-fried dish without the guilt because Yabu uses 100% Canola Oil, which has a healthy dose of Omega 3, zero trans fat, and zero cholesterol. They also use fresh panko or Japanese breadcrumbs to make it extra crispy.

What We Love

Before diving into the meal, first try out an appetizer. For starters, we recommend having the Seaweed Salad with Ebiko on top, and the Silken Tofu in Ponzu Sauce (P175).

For your main course, your man would certainly love their signature dish, the Premium Tonkatsu Set or Kurobuta Pork Set (P515), which is served with Japanese rice, miso soup, Japanese pickles, unlimited cabbage with sesame dressing, and a bowl of fruit. The meat they use, Kurobuta, also known as the Black Berkshire pig, is considered the world's finest pork. In fact, it is even hailed "the kobe beef of pork" due to its marbling, flavor, and extreme softness.

You can also order your favorite Katsudon (pork for P265 or chicken for P260), which is composed of a two-egg omelet and special sweet sauce ladled over tender katsu and served in a bowl of steaming Japanese rice. The Katsudon Set comes with the works: miso soup, Japanese pickles, unlimited cabbage with sesame dressing, and a bowl of fruit.

If you love curry, why don't you try Japanese curry, which is thicker, sweeter, and not as spicy as other Asian curries like Thai or Malay. Yabu's homemade curry is made with 45 ingredients and is slow-cooked to perfection on the spot--you can even tell the server how spicy you want yours to be: mild, regular, or hot. Try the Chicken Katsu (P290) and the Rosu (pork) Katsu Curry (P295), said to be the fave of Anne Curtis no less! Katsu Curry Sets are served with Japanese rice, miso soup, Japanese pickles, unlimited cabbage with sesame dressing, and a bowl of fruit, too.

Weight-watchers who want to veer from meat can instead get the Seafood Katsu Set (P425, seen in photo), which has a mix of jumbo prawns, cream dory, U.S. scallops, and Hiroshima Japanese oysters. Like all katsu sets, it is served with Japanese rice, miso soup, Japanese pickles, unlimited cabbage with sesame dressing, and a bowl of fruit, which makes it really sulit. If you just want the jumbo prawns, get the Jumbo Prawn Set (P425), which has four pieces of Japanese Black Tiger Praws, complete with the rest of the katsu set add-ons.

For drinks, why don't you order Shochu or Sake? Try the refreshing Iichicko Super mixed with four seasons juice (instant cocktail!), which goes well with all the katsu dishes.

Launch the gallery to see photos of the scrumptious offerings at Yabu!


Yabu: House of Katsu is located at 2/F The Atrium, SM Megamall. Call 576-3900 for inquiries.

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