What To Eat If You Are Staying Away From White Rice

A cup of steamed white rice has approximately 242 calories.

We compiled a list of alternatives to white rice to satisfy your cravings without the carbo-loaded guilt.

1. Brown rice

200-220 calories per cup

Why it’s healthier: You stave off only a few calories per cup, but you’re getting more fiber, which helps lower cholesterol and aids in digestion.

2. Red or black rice

600 calories per cup, but health experts suggest that 1/3 cup (200 calories) is enough for a serving

Why it’s healthier: Although you have to consume less than your usual cup, red or black rice has higher fiber and protein content than brown or white rice.

3. Cauliflower

When stir-fried in vegetable oil, it’s about 150 calories per cup. When steamed with no oil, it’s down to only 50 calories per cup.

Why it’s healthier: Cauliflower rice has become the new “it” rice for the calorie-conscious. There are many recipes available online, and it usually involves chopping the fresh cauliflower until it reaches the consistency of couscous or rice grains, and then steaming or stir-frying it alone or sautéed with onions and other seasonings.

4. Corn

124 calories per cup of sweet yellow corn

It has lower GI (glycemic index), which is good news for diabetics, and has almost half the carb content of white rice. Corn also contains more protein, fiber, minerals, and anti-oxidants.

5. Sweet potatoes

181 calories per cup of baked/boiled potatoes with skin, without salt

Ever wondered why kamote is such a hit with the CrossFit community? It tops their diet list of Paleo-friendly carbs because it contains a variety of vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

6. Quinoa

222 calories per cup

To stave off calories, health buffs mix only 1/3 to 1/2 cup of quinoa with veggies. The carb content is nearly the same as white rice, but the protein and fiber content is higher, which is why quinoa is a staple for most vegans.

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7. Barley

640 calories per cup

Before you gasp at the calorie content, note that health buffs eat only 1/4 to 1/3 cup per serving of this cereal grain. It’s more nutritious in fiber, protein, potassium, and other minerals compared to white rice. It takes longer to cook and needs more water than with brown rice. Make sure you pick the hulled, whole grain version because the pearled or refined version contains fewer nutrients.

Calorie content sources: My Fitness Pal and Calorie Count

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