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In Photos: What's It Like To Live In Australia During COVID-19?

Public transport is still operational.
PHOTO: ISHI CASTRO
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Australia is one of the few countries that have been applauded for their efforts in containing the coronavirus, making sure it didn't cripple their healthcare system. Taking it a step farther, Australia also launched a voluntary tracking app that's meant to use bluetooth signals to record if people have been close to each other. Several groups have argued that the app is an invasion of privacy; but the government has said that it's not meant to track your location—and is therefore safe.

Despite this controversy, the country has been pretty good about handling COVID-19. Along with neighboring New Zealand, they're already talking about loosening the social distancing rules currently in place. To give you a glimpse of what Australia is like right now, here are photos submitted to Cosmopolitan Philippines by Kat Creevey and Ishi Castro.

Brisbane

This is the Goodwill Bridge, a dedicated footbridge connecting the south side to the Central Business District. It's usually bustling with people walking to work or university, cyclists, and runners. Since the social distancing measures were announced, this area has become noticeably quiet with fewer people accessing it. KAT CREEVEY
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Melbourne

There are long lines at markets but usually it just takes less than ten minutes to get in. They also placed barricades and stationed personnel by the supermarket entrances to make sure that people wouldn’t crowd together and that only a certain amount of people were inside the store. ISHI CASTRO
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It is also quite common to see floor stickers such as this to remind people to distance from one another. I live in Melbourne, Victoria, and people take social distancing seriously. Just last week, I witnessed a man getting upset over a woman walking too close behind him. It is also common to hear about police officers fining violators for as much as $1,600. ISHI CASTRO
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In Melbourne, all public transport is still operational. I usually take this tram line to work. It’s usually packed but now hardly anyone’s on it. ISHI CASTRO

I’m currently taking my Masters and everything has been migrated online. I used to look forward to engaging in discussions, but I guess Zoom classes will be the norm now. My university also closed and we can no longer access the facilities on campus. Last week, I went to campus and it was eerily deserted. ISHI CASTRO
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I was amused to see the campus so empty that I shamelessly had my photo taken in front of my favorite building (This staircase is normally so busy!). ISHI CASTRO

Since we’re still allowed to go to the park, there are more people than usual. Princes Park is usually a place for runners, but I’ve seen more people taking walks now. ISHI CASTRO
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This small spot in my room has been my makeshift workout space for three weeks now. I usually attend yoga classes several times a week, but I’ve been watching online classes in the meantime. ISHI CASTRO

I’m the type of person who loves going out, enjoying the outdoors, and meeting up with friends. Now, like most people around the world, I study and work at home and I feel so cooped up. Most of the day, I just sit in this corner. ISHI CASTRO
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People cope differently. As for me, I cope by trying new things and so I tried cooking. Prior to living overseas, I was not domesticated at all so cooking is very new to me. I enjoy cooking because the different colors of the ingredients cheer me up and the final outcome gives me a sense of fulfillment. ISHI CASTRO
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Photos were submitted in April 2020. Visit reportr.world for more COVID-19 stories.